• Latest news

    Latest news

  • Latest news

    Latest news

Structural Concrete, Vol. 4, no. 3, September 2003

Investigation of temperature and strain distribution in reinforced-concrete wall of a rapeseed storage silo

K. Diamoutene, Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland
M. Kaminski, Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland

The results of experimental research carried out on reinforced-concrete storage silos and of a numerical analysis of the temperature distribution in the silo wall are presented. Temperature fields in the structure were determined and the finite element method was applied to analyse the forces and moments generated by the thermal fields.

Structural Concrete, Vol. 4, no. 2, June 2003

Theoretical model for the determination of plastic rotation capacity in reinforced concrete beams

R. N. F. do Carmo, Department of Civil Engineering, ISEC-Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra Portugal
S. M. R. Lopes, Department of Civil Engineering, FCTUC-Polo II-University of Coimbra Portugal
L. F A. Bernardo, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Beira Interior Portugal

Evaluating the ducility of reinforced concrete beams is essential in order to avoid a fragile collapse of the structure by ensuring an adequate deformation at ultimate load. This paper presents a theoretical model for the calculation of plastic rotation. Results obtained are compared with those obtained from an experimental programme in which a set of beams were tested to failure. From the comparison, a good agreement between theoretical and experimental results was achieved. The proposed theoretical model considers the influence of certain factors: steel properties, concrete strength, section depth, and the tension stiffening effect. Concrete strength, particularly, is an interesting parameter since for high-strength concrete, the ultimate concrete strain, εcu, decreases as the concrete strength increases.

Structural Concrete, Vol. 4, no. 3, September 2003

Durability of concrete structures

Catherine French, University of Minnesota, USA

This paper provides a brief overview of Session 8 'Durability of Concrete Structures' of the fib 2002 congress on Concrete Structures in the 21st Century, which was held in Osaka on 13-19 October 2002. The keynote speaker of the session, Dr Odd E. Gjørv, Professor and Head of the Department of Building Materials at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology at Trondheim, has conducted concrete research for more than 40 years. His research has focused on a broad range of topics related to the durability of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures in severe environments. His paper addressed durability and service-life issues of concrete structures. In addition to the keynote address, more than 50 papers were considered for this session, covering topics in the following areas: general issues related to concrete serviceability and durability, corrosion of reinforcement, and grouting of post-tensioned systems, as well as several case studies. The highlights of some of the papers are described here.

Structural Concrete, Vol. 4, no. 2, June 2003

Structural behaviour of steel fibre reinforced concrete

I. Kovacs, College Faculty of Technology, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Debrecen, Hungary
G. L. Balazs, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Department of Construction Materials and Engineering Geology, Hungary

Results of an experimental study on 21 fibre reinforced concrete beams indicate that steel fibres do not only increase shear capacity but also provide substantial post-peak resistance and ductility in conventionally reinforced beams as well as in prestressed pretensioned concrete beams. The tests were carried out on 2m long beam specimens reinforced with longitudinal bars and fibres. Test variables were amount and type of fibres, amount of stirrups and type of longitudinal reinforcement (prestressed or non-prestressed).

Structural Concrete, Vol. 4, no. 2, June 2003

Structural behaviour of steel fibre reinforced concrete

I. Kovacs, College Faculty of Technology, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Debrecen, Hungary
G. L. Balazs, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Department of Construction Materials and Engineering Geology, Hungary

Results of an experimental study on 21 fibre reinforced concrete beams indicate that steel fibres do not only increase shear capacity but also provide substantial post-peak resistance and ductility in conventionally reinforced beams as well as in prestressed pretensioned concrete beams. The tests were carried out on 2m long beam specimens reinforced with longitudinal bars and fibres. Test variables were amount and type of fibres, amount of stirrups and type of longitudinal reinforcement (prestressed or non-prestressed).

fib postal address

Case postale 88
CH-1015 Lausanne
Switzerland

Contact

p : +41 21 693 27 47
f : +41 21 693 62 45
e : info@fib-international.org
w : www.fib-international.org

Follow fib

Subscribe our newsletter

 Follow us on
        

Join the fib

Join the fib